HELP! Hind Leg Dropping, any thoughts?

[QUOTE=Lieslot;8160817]
Your last post answers my thoughts entirely when I saw the videos.

My horse had the slipping stifle problem too, catching, losing his balance in the hindend as a result. If you are interested I also have videos of him doing the same thing your horse did, I just don’t have it in slow motion.
He had it on both stifles, but left moreso than right. We tried to treat it, but no surgery. Then we figured he had SI problems, treated SI & lumbar & greater trochanter.
Did lots of strengthening work, it never really got better.
After a myriad of injections and treatments and every diagnostic available including a full bone scan that all came back negative, I just gave up an retired him. 2 yrs into retirement we couldn’t miss it anymore the fetlocks dropped and he was finally diagnosed with DSLD.

Your horse may not have the degenerative part, but he could well have the onset of desmopathy.
Now I realize that the stifle, the SI, the lumbar pain my horse exhibited, those were all secondary to the primary problem being the suspensories that hurt upon each stretch and in an effort to protect himself he wasn’t using his stifles correctly.

I suspect suspensories over a real stifle problem when I don’t see a distinct shortened stride. My horse had a long stride and to this day still does with his very dropped fetlocks, but the pain is there. If you have a more distinct shortness of stride, than I’d be more inclined to think stifles first and the rest secondary.

FYI, it took a couple of years for the degeneration of the suspensories to be diagnostically visible, but the pain & lameness were already there. Bonescan & ultrasound in my guy’s suspensories were totally clear only, 2 yrs later when he fully dropped was the degeneration suddenly noticeable on the ultrasound.

Good luck![/QUOTE]

I’m curious with both of these cases, OP and yours, did/do your horses have continually swelling in the fetlock area behind? I agree this doesn’t look like “typical” UFP.

I’m curious with both of these cases, OP and yours, did/do your horses have continually swelling in the fetlock area behind? I agree this doesn’t look like “typical” UFP.

Hi Dune,
My horse used to stock up in the hindlegs when stalled, but I never thought much of this, well at least not at first, I used to just wrap him when stalled.
When I did not wrap him, the swellings stayed longer than I wanted them to, my other oldie stocks up a little too when stalled, but as soon as he’s turned out and starts moving the swellings goes down very rapidly, with my suspensory guy he pretty much needed some good exercise for the fluids to move out of those hindlegs.
Right now he lives in tubigrip stockings or polo bandages. I cannot let him go unsupported anymore at all, else it’s takes too long to get the swellings to go down again. As long as I keep him either wrapped or tubigripped (kentucky tendon grip or equisleeves) the swellings stay down, but the fetlocks are enlarged now, not fluid just hard soft tissues.

[QUOTE=Magichorse19;8156134]
Thanks for the well wishes. I’ve kinda put everything into him. This development is kinda crushing actually.[/QUOTE]

I have a horse with a similar problem, almost exclusively at the canter. Keep us posted