Dressage bit: Eggbutt or D-Ring

So I am in the market for trying a new bit that is dressage legal. And I have narrowed it down to two different ones, eggbutt or D-ring. I have been trying to figure out which one would be best. Like what are the characteristics that the bits have?
Currently I ride in a Baucher that is double jointed. Recently she just has not been going very well in the bit. When I put her in a bit we use for jumping, a single jointed pelham bit she seems to go much better. She listens more to my aids in not only my hand, but also my seat and legs, which is maybe a little weird.
I want to use a single jointed, but am unsure about which one to use. The problem isn’t that she doesn’t have breaks, it’s just that she can be a little heavy in the mouth, and easily balls up her energy. I am not looking for a harsh bit, just something that might make her more sensitive, since sometimes she can seem pretty dead in the mouth, and possibly something with a little more control.

as far as eggbutt or D ring goes, they will give a similar feel so either would be fine. you should be able to find a single joint in either ring style pretty cheaply to try BUT i have ha huge success with the new sprenger novocontact bits.

my 4yo goes in the single joint eggbutt(which actually looks more like a D) and a clients slightly strong and chompy mare was transformed by the eggbutt lozenge.

can you hire them to try?

For most horses, you wont really notice the difference between an egg-but and a D-ring. For a few young or resistant horses that want to poke their nose out in a direction opposite the rein pressure, the D ring may give you a bit more control, and/or avoid a potentially uncomfortable (but rare) situation where the ring slides into the horses mouth. On the other hand, a drop or flash noseband can fit more comfortably with the egg-butt. Though overall, most horses won’t even notice the difference, and it will be a question of what you think looks nicer. I think the D-ring makes them look like a hunter.

Why are you not considering a loose-ring? For a horse that tends to be a bit “dead” in the mouth like you describe, it gives a bit more “feel” and encourages them to mouth the bit productively. It is no gentler or harsher than the egg-butt. I have seen a few horses who get pinched by where the ring joins the bit, but that is quite rare if the bit and bridle fit correctly.

Well, the d-ring is designed to give more “shank” (and poll) leverage to the bit, while the egg-but is softer in the leverage.

What do you mean by “not going well” in the Boucher? That has a large amount of leverage in the poll. You say you’re riding in a pelham right now and your horse goes better…you have to ask yourself “why”. Is it the leverage of the longer shank on the mouth instead of the poll?

I agree - why not use a double-jointed loosering for flatwork in order to “lighten” your horse’s mouth?

[QUOTE=J-Lu;8610029]Well, the d-ring is designed to give more “shank” (and poll) leverage to the bit, while the egg-but is softer in the leverage.

What do you mean by “not going well” in the Boucher? That has a large amount of leverage in the poll. You say you’re riding in a pelham right now and your horse goes better…you have to ask yourself “why”. Is it the leverage of the longer shank on the mouth instead of the poll?

I agree - why not use a double-jointed loosering for flatwork in order to “lighten” your horse’s mouth?[/QUOTE]

what?!

theres no shank or leverage on either an eggbutt or a D ring and also none on a baucher(if you research the way the bit moves and the rein slides round the ring…)

There is NO leverage on a baucher. If you think about it, it’s kind of like the snaffle rein part of a pelham. What about just going to a single-joint baucher?

Nothing dressage legal is going to provide leverage (except a double bridle). It may be that the curb action from the pelham is what makes the horse more responsive, or that it’s actually just putting the horse in a false frame.

IME, D-ring is best for finesse in schooling or teaching lateral movement. Eggbutt is a close second. The loose ring can be “noisy” and unstable in horses who tend to fuss, and I don’t always find that I can get super subtle engagement cues from a loose ring… but I do like it for jumping. There’s very little possibility, if any at all, of pinching the corner of the mouth with a fixed bit like an eggbutt or D-ring.

The more horses I reschool (mostly OTTBs) the more I find my first go-to is an Eggbutt with a lozenge – usually Herm Sprenger variety. I like that I have more of an “area” to cue with - in a loose ring I think the only part you can affect is the mouthpiece… In a fixed cheek like a D-ring or Eggbut, you also have influence over the actual bit ring as well, which can pressure the corner of the mouth, the muzzle, lower but outside jaw, etc.

You are probably finding your mare more responsive and less heavy in the Pelham because it really encourages horses to keep their head and neck up - the single joint action, when applied, can cause pressure on the bar and roof of the mouth which most horses do not care for.

[QUOTE=GeniGirl;8608342]So I am in the market for trying a new bit that is dressage legal. And I have narrowed it down to two different ones, eggbutt or D-ring. I have been trying to figure out which one would be best. Like what are the characteristics that the bits have?
.[/QUOTE]

People have explained the difference in the feel of the cheek pieces (minimal), but do be aware that just because a bit has eggbutt or d-ring rings, that doesn’t mean it’s dressage legal.

The mouthpiece is part of the equation as well.