Equitation exercises without a horse?

Does anyone have exercises to improve your equitation without a horse involved? I have a lot to do while riding my horse, but I would really like ones to do when I can’t get out to ride, so I can continue practicing.

Ones focusing on lower leg and core strength are greatly appreciated! (But I’m happy with whatever you guys can find.)

Thank you.

Stand on one leg while you are brushing your teeth, doing your hair, etc. alternate legs to work on both sides. Or try squats.

These are some great, simple core exercises. Do this set of exercises 2-3 times a week. Add reps if it feels easy.
one-leg deadlift - 6 each leg
Pike - 8 each side
superman crunch 10 reps
rotational plank - 5 each side
Leg lifts (prob self explanatory, but lie on back, lift both legs together, lower slowly without touching floor, repeat 10x)

And, CARDIO!! Our riding form starts to fall apart as we fatigue and lose our wind.

Just went to a Daniel Stewart clinic (a must go to audit if he is ever nearby) and he has a great new workout very specifically designed for equestrians. Only did about 5 minutes of it at the clinic and could definitely feel it. I have been keeping it up for the past couple of weeks and can tell I am getting stronger.
It’s a 12 minutes workout you can do at the barn or anywhere.
Here’s his website http://www.stewartclinics.com/ although I am not sure he has info on the workout there. He did have a DVD at the clinic.
Just found these on youtube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJl6NNuEAeQ

Pilates is an important tool for the rider. It brings equal strength and balance and focuses on the core for strength. Being uneven in yur strength , coordination and flexiblity can translate to having a one-sided horses.

There are even Pilates programs for riders mounted.

To help develop independent hands walk around with two mugs full of water. Advance version, stairs.

When going up stairs use your ankles.

My trainer is working on my issues and one is not having as much of an independent hand/arm from my body. She said she does squats and will rotate her arms all around as she does the squats… She’s so cute… I laughed asking if her husband ever walked in while she was doing that? LOL

[QUOTE=BEARCAT;7708110]Just went to a Daniel Stewart clinic (a must go to audit if he is ever nearby) and he has a great new workout very specifically designed for equestrians. Only did about 5 minutes of it at the clinic and could definitely feel it. I have been keeping it up for the past couple of weeks and can tell I am getting stronger.
It’s a 12 minutes workout you can do at the barn or anywhere.
Here’s his website http://www.stewartclinics.com/ although I am not sure he has info on the workout there. He did have a DVD at the clinic.
Just found these on youtube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJl6NNuEAeQ[/QUOTE]

Those are great… and hysterical… I was waiting for him to fall off the table. Thanks for sharing… I will do those too :slight_smile: Not on a table however!!!

Thank you everyone!

If you’ve got time, take some yoga classes. You will get stronger, more flexible, and better able to isolate various body parts. I just came off 7 months without riding, but did yoga for the whole time. After just a couple rides, my riding feels almost like it did ten years ago. MUCH better.

I so want to do that!! I told my husband the other day that once the kids go back to school I want to find a local Yoga place… he said okay - a local YOGURT place…

I just joined a Pilates studio. The owner is also a hunter/jumper rider who offers sessions specifically designed for equestrians! I suspect the focus on core body strength and leg strength will have a positive effect on my riding abilities.

Resistance training and adductor machines can help

I second everyone who has suggested yoga or pilates or cardio.

Resistance training is also helpful. It is good to have a strong upper body, helps prevent back pain. And it makes it easier to deal with pullers and to pull yourself back into position if you get jumped out of the tack or ever find yourself hanging halfway down your horse’s side for some reason.

Some gyms have “adductor” machines which allow you to work the insides of the thighs, which are important riding muscles that most other exercise programs neglect.