Good manners for the baby

I have recently brought home a new (7 month old) friesain/appy cross colt. He has a sweet, curious temperment and has really begun to settle into his new home. My question pertains to his manners. What are some of the “naughty” behaviors that I need to watch out for? Currently, he greets me at his stall door, he is turned out with a “nanny” mare and will hopefully be worked into a herd soon. He is learning all about picking up his feet and standing for the farrier. He will balk at times when being led and other times he might charge ahead or walk nicely beside me.

He has the genetic potential to get pretty large pretty quick so I want to nip some of this in the bud early on to start him on the path of good citizenship. I love working with this little guy but he sure makes me appreciate my 17-yo Oldenberg! Any advice or insight is greatly appreciated. :winkgrin:

What would you consider a naughty behavior from an adult?

A horse is still a horse, regardless of age or size :wink:

His described behavior could easily belong to an adult horse. It’s very, very typical behavior for a foal though. Nip all those things in the bud now. He’s not being mean, he’s just testing his boundaries as the ALL do. Just realize he’s not being mean about it, he has simply not been taught the proper way to do things all the time, so teach him :slight_smile:

I want to see pictures of him being naughty or nice.

Never miss a chance to move his shoulder AWAY from you - on both sides. Get that behavior ingrained in him.
As a matter of fact, practice having him move out of your space as much as you can.

And yes, I want to see pictures too!!

Nip the charging and balking in the bud. Mine lead, trot in hand and halt, besides basic ground manners. And I teach them to load with food. This is super important since I am solo. I had to take my youngun to the vet last week and she loaded up with just me.

When I got my first baby horse (weeks old, not months :wink: ) my mantra was “If it’s not cute when my 1300lb QH does it, it’s not cute when my foal/weanling/yearling/two year old does it.” He is fifteen this year and is the best mannered horse I’ve ever met, bar none, and frequently receives compliments on his manners.

Calmly, quietly correct his behaviour every chance you get. Insistence, persistence, and consistency are your best tools. Correct his misbehaviour by insisting on the proper behaviour - replace his chosen actions with your chosen actions for him rather than disciplining the undesirable behaviour. Horses in general, and babies in particular, are far better at “DO this” than they are at “STOP that!”

Treat him like the horse you want him to become. Expect the behaviour you want him to have, and calmly insist on it. It will pay off in the future. :slight_smile:

Thanks for the input. I keep a dressage whip in hand to tap his behind with when he pulls back. (So far a tap is all that has been needed) What is the best way to correct him when he tries to charge ahead?

Here are some pictures of him at a few weeks old. Recent pictures are on my phone and haven’t been uploaded yet.

http://i1331.photobucket.com/albums/w594/Jaymeben/image_zps87d49b64.jpg

http://i1331.photobucket.com/albums/w594/Jaymeben/image_zps55425fa0.jpg

http://i1331.photobucket.com/albums/w594/Jaymeben/image_zps4ef94c04.jpg

Never miss a chance to move his shoulder AWAY from you - on both sides. Get that behavior ingrained in him.

The farrier just complimented us on this! The personal space issue is tough for me because I just want to hug him all the time:tickled_pink:

Oh he is sweet. What, though, made the breeder breed that mix since it is, to be honest, rather unorthodox, but successful! What does he move like?

What do you plan for him. I think I want him. (want, not need!)

He is very athletic with a pretty fancy trot. I tried to resist him but couldn’t! I’m hoping he is my next dressage prospect.

My baby was a sweet little puppy until he hit 14 months. I was warned to look out for the terrible twos, but I was like, this sweet thing? Nah. Oh boy. I still snuggle him, but he did learn some manners. He was rearing, striking, head shaking, just turned into a bossy brat that wanted his own way. Lol he’s just turned 3 now, it’s pretty much gone.

This post should come with a cuteness alert!!!

omgosh he’s ADORABLE!!

Gah, I almost hate to see nice Friesian crosses because all it does is fuel the desire for folks who don’t need to be, making those crosses ,and more often than not, they are not anywhere NEAR this nice :yes: :no: Mostly because those BYBs are picking the most convenient Friesian stallion who was never accepted into the stud book because he’s not good enough :frowning: :no: :rolleyes:

This guy DOES look like a pretty fancy mover :slight_smile:

You ARE allowed to hug on him all the time. It is your every right to come into his space whenever you want, as long as it’s polite. He has to accept that. He doesn’t ever have to LIKE it, and some just never do, but he’s got to tolerate it.

However, he does not get the free choice to invade your space, and that’s all you have to work on :slight_smile: If you are hugging on him and he starts leaning on you or trying to bowl you over (intentional or not) then you make a correction.

I wish the term Back Yard Breeder was not said so disparagingly - I’m a BYB and I have nice horses. There re quite a few who breed on a large scale and don’t breed nice horses, just mass produce 'em, puppymill style, too. Jack Russels are a doggy version of the same thing - hence their bad reputation which is quite unjustified when from good lines.

For me, BYB is not the same as amateur breeder, or a professional breeder who only does 1 or 2 foals a year, or 50 foals a year, when consideration is taken into bloodlines, performance, and matching mare to stallion.

BYB is someone who breeds their sweet mare (and often not so sweet, thinking breeding will calm her down :frowning: ) to the local stallion because he’s cheap and close, thinking very little about type to type, not thinking about the future of the foal.

BYB is regardless of number of foals - the *%&@# Paint breeder who breeds 100 mares just to get enough colored foals to sell, disposing of the solid ones, is a BYB. The breeder who tosses a non-name Friesian stallion out with her 50 QH mares because "friesian crosses are all the rage’ is a BYB.

BYB is about mentality, not numbers.

Oh goodness, I don’t like spotted horses, but he is CUTE!

Carry a crop. Use as much as needed. I sold my filly as a rising 2 year old. The PPE vet commented repeatedly on how exceptionally well-behaved she was, and that she wouldn’t expect a 12 year old to be so good, much less a 2 year old. When she was young, any bad behavior was corrected quickly and firmly with a good tap or whack. She figured out pretty quick what the rules were and not to break them.

One thing I always did–I corrected every bad behavior with a stronger bit of discipline. If, on a scale of 1-10, her behavior was a 3, I corrected her for a 5. In my head, I call this “jump bid discipline”. In an auction*, a jump bid is when the bidding is going “15-20-25” and you jump in with “40”. It lets the other bidders know you’re serious and they back off. Same deal with my filly. I wanted her to know I meant business and it was in her best interests to knock it off NOW, rather than press her luck. I have no idea if there’s a real term for this or if it’s how everyone does it or what.

As was said, if it’s not okay for an adult horse, it’s not okay for a baby.

*Please note, my auction experience is limited to once a year at a Boy Scout patch auction, at which I am famous for ruthlessly bidding on pretty patches and/or ones with animals.

Hah!

You should have seen her last night!

In preparation for going to Waredaca for the FEH on Saturday, last night we trailered to a barn about 7 miles away, where there were lessons going on. So, less distractions than at a show, but more than at home.

Unfortunately, SHE provided the distraction to the horses in the ring. She felt the need to call to EVERYON!

She was DEFINITELY a handful. (She had been being so good at home, I forgot to bring the chain shank, which would have made things easier.)

She DID respond to every correction, but I had to keep 100% of my attention on her. And she EVENTUALLY settled down to a flat footed walk, but it took a while.

Saturday should be “interesting”. We are going to arrive several HOURS early.

[QUOTE=Janet;7008533]Hah!

You should have seen her last night!

In preparation for going to Waredaca for the FEH on Saturday, last night we trailered to a barn about 7 miles away, where there were lessons going on. So, less distractions than at a show, but more than at home.

Unfortunately, SHE provided the distraction to the horses in the ring. She felt the need to call to EVERYON!

She was DEFINITELY a handful. (She had been being so good at home, I forgot to bring the chain shank, which would have made things easier.)

She DID respond to every correction, but I had to keep 100% of my attention on her. And she EVENTUALLY settled down to a flat footed walk, but it took a while.

Saturday should be “interesting”. We are going to arrive several HOURS early.[/QUOTE]

LOL! What’s that saying about bad rehearsal and good performance? I’m so glad you’re taking her to an FEH; you’ll have to let me know how she does ASAP! At least she responds to correction… I can’t stand horses who ignore you or get mad at you. Hopefully if you get there plenty early she’ll have lots of time to talk to everyone before she goes in the ring!

[QUOTE=Janet;7008533]Hah!

You should have seen her last night!

In preparation for going to Waredaca for the FEH on Saturday, last night we trailered to a barn about 7 miles away, where there were lessons going on. So, less distractions than at a show, but more than at home.

Unfortunately, SHE provided the distraction to the horses in the ring. She felt the need to call to EVERYON!

She was DEFINITELY a handful. (She had been being so good at home, I forgot to bring the chain shank, which would have made things easier.)

She DID respond to every correction, but I had to keep 100% of my attention on her. And she EVENTUALLY settled down to a flat footed walk, but it took a while.

Saturday should be “interesting”. We are going to arrive several HOURS early.[/QUOTE]

Don’t just make a correction, make her WORK. If I am schooling my gelding and he is calling to the other horses, he is being rude and is not focusing on the task at hand. Not acceptable. Want to be rude, you’re going to work.