Horse described in vet report as BAR, what does this mean?

Just as the title says, my horse was described as BAR on a vet report following a lameness and general exam. What does this mean?

Bright, Alert, and Responsive.

You should be able to call and ask your vet any questions like this.

BAR=Bright, Alert, and Responsive. Means the horse seemed normal and appropriate in attitude, mentation, behavior, etc.

Or it could have meant that your horse was an obnoxious PITA for the exam, and the vet needs to go to a bar afterwards for a few drinks to settle his nerves!!!:smiley:

Lol!!

[QUOTE=WildandWickedWarmbloods;7238979]Bright, Alert, and Responsive.

You should be able to call and ask your vet any questions like this.[/QUOTE]

And sometimes it is just faster to ask on COTH.

Thanks for the replies all. And lol, if it had my youngster then I can imagine the vet may have needed a drink after :eek: Hahaha, this guy is a doll for the vet.

And SonnysMom, that’s exactly why I asked here. Just quicker. My vet is great and always happy to answer questions however, being a great vet, she’s also usually very busy so just didn’t want to bother her with something that I figured was a simple question.

And there is
QAR: Quiet, alert, responisve
ADR: Ain’t doing right. Though that is usually an owner complaint, not a DVM comment
ATH: Adimt to hospital
NSF: No significant findings
WNL:within normal limits
CRI: Continuous rate infusion
And on, and on. We have way too much to write in records so we all abreviate. Some more than others. :slight_smile:

Oh, there’s more…

HBC= hit by car

GSW= gun shot wound

And on my “human” medical chart at the ER…

FOH= Fell Off Horse

FOHA= Fell Off Horse Again. Patient has slow learning curve.

ER doc went to school with my DH. If he sees DH, his first question is always: “What room is she in and what did she do this time?”.

NQR= not quite right. Also on my chart.

PO: per os

Thanks for the replies. Got vet coming to see one of my mares on Wed so will see whether she uses any of these!

:slight_smile:

AFMYGMI

“Another Fine Mess You Got Me In, Ollie”

When I was working in the EMS field, we’d use BAR casually when giving the report to the receiving hospital (i.e. not in the official written report) but it would always have “FU” in front of it.

FUBAR: F*d up beyond all recognition.

[QUOTE=Starhouse;7248035]When I was working in the EMS field, we’d use BAR casually when giving the report to the receiving hospital (i.e. not in the official written report) but it would always have “FU” in front of it.

FUBAR: F*d up beyond all recognition.[/QUOTE]

Oh geeze, I know a few EMTs who regularly use that expression about the calls they respond to >.< they tend to involve a good ole redneck brawl lol.

Hehe yup, or in my case, it was a college ambulance service so we dealt with lots of alcohol/stupidity-related mayhem!

My favorite EMT abbreviations were -

PEARL - pupils equal and reactive to light
ETOH - alcohol, as in “suspect ETOH was a factor in the accident.”
AOX3 - alert and oriented times 3, person, time and place.
GOMER - a person that the ER doesn’t really want to treat, for a variety of reasons. Stands for “Get out of my emergency room.”

“bad off sick” this is actually a legitimate emergency medical term to describe someone who is sick, rather than injured, but needs emergency care. A 70 year old who has had puking flu for three days, can’t keep food down, and is now dehydrated and disoriented from the dehydration can properly be described to the triage nurse as “bad off sick”

And … DRT, an abbreviation that’s the logical extension of DOA, dead on arrival. A DRT is “dead right there”, injuries so catastrophic that even the EMT can make the call.

DOS= Dead on Scene
DOR= Dead on Road

DOS is a cop term, which EMTs also use, and DOR is dept. of natural resources cop term for animals on roadways.

Lol, some of these are hilarious. Perhaps there should be similar abbreviations/acronyms for bad/phoney trainers, farriers, trimmers, etc :lol:

Haha! LOL

FOH= Fell Off Horse

FOHA= Fell Off Horse Again. Patient has slow learning curve.

:lol::lol: