Loose ring in the hunter ring

Is it illegal to show hunters in a loose ring bit? Ideally at a schooling show, but for my own reference I would like to know the ruling on this from USEF. I can’t find anything in the rule book about loose rings. Thanks in advance!!

Nope

Very much legal, just not in style.

Remove any bit guards if you use them.

It’s just fine. I won several tri-colors in a rated division in a loose ring.

HU125 Tack1. Snaffles, pelhams and full bridles, all with cavesson nose bands, are required.a. Judges may penalize, but may not eliminate, a horse or pony that competes in anunconventional snaffle, pelham, or full bridle. Unconventional snaffles, pelhams, orfull bridles include, but are not limited to, hunter gags, kimberwickes, etc

this pretty much covers it

the rule book will not spell out detail by detail, it is covered by saying, snaffles permitted

Use to be loose ring was the norm, particularly for young / green horses.

Thanks everyone! That’s what I thought but couldn’t find anything specific for or against them. Any rules/regulations on mouth pieces? Particularly a hollow rubber mullen mouth (floppy/soft/whatever you want to call it)…

“Humane”. Not that anyone is checking.

What kind is a hollow rubber mullen mouth? It should at least have a chain in the middle for strength or if it is chewed through. HS Duo? Flexible, but not hollow.

A loose ring would be considered unconventional in my area, it may be different in other parts of the country.

I doubt any judge is going to look at a loose ring and interpret that under the rules of “unconventional”

dont confuse fashion and trend with rules

yeah, unconventional the way the rule describes it is more understood to be “a whole lot more bit than anyone else is using… that I can see from my judge’s stand, anyway”

Also I think those old fashioned soft black rubber mullen mouths (dogbones) were just rubber, no internal wire like the newer bits.

I’ve seen many hunters on the As showing in a loose ring - it is perfectly legal. If that is what your horse likes, than don’t hesitate to use it. Horsemanship first; following trends second.

I showed all summer at the A shows local to me in a loose ring and gasp breastplate! Shocking I know - two “off trend” items at the same time! The horror! Didn’t prevent me from getting a reserve champion and lots of 1st, 2nd and 3rd place ribbons though.

Totally legal.

If you have the winner, a loose ring is probably not going to matter. At a schooling show not at all. If you have a conformation hunter and are trying to win the model, the D ring is known to flatter heads and is what judges are used to seeing…your horse might stand out a bit and perhaps seem less “slick” to be wearing an untrendy bit and maybe subconsciously the judge will think the horse is less quality unless truly impressive. But a loose ring really isn’t that offensive or noticeable or unconventional. If your horse goes best in one you will have a much better chance of good ribbons than a bad trip in a D ring!

Although I really don’t think they make that much of a difference and often pinch…

[QUOTE=keepthelegend;8414790]Totally legal.

If you have the winner, a loose ring is probably not going to matter. At a schooling show not at all. If you have a conformation hunter and are trying to win the model, the D ring is known to flatter heads and is what judges are used to seeing…your horse might stand out a bit and perhaps seem less “slick” to be wearing an untrendy bit and maybe subconsciously the judge will think the horse is less quality unless truly impressive. But a loose ring really isn’t that offensive or noticeable or unconventional. If your horse goes best in one you will have a much better chance of good ribbons than a bad trip in a D ring!

Although I really don’t think they make that much of a difference and often pinch…[/QUOTE]
This. The only reason I would not use a loose ring is because you really can’t use bit guards and without them, I find that they tend to pinch and just look a little untidy. I’ve always found that a d-ring with the same mouth piece works just the same and looks better and is less likely to do pinching. I do have a loose ring with bit guards on our schooling bridle.

Loose ring, as in the typical KK bits used in dressage?

99.999% of dressage people use Loose Rings, and never ever have bit guards. Ever.

If properly fitted there is no need for a bit guard. Some people size up 1/4’ to allow them to move well. Maybe this is some HJ folk tale, but I found it an odd statement.

An eggbut is another good option, right?

And no, I wouldn’t think twice about showing in a loose ring, assuming everything was traditional otherwise.

[QUOTE=cuatx55;8415547]Loose ring, as in the typical KK bits used in dressage?

99.999% of dressage people use Loose Rings, and never ever have bit guards. Ever.

If properly fitted there is no need for a bit guard. Some people size up 1/4’ to allow them to move well. Maybe this is some HJ folk tale, but I found it an odd statement.

An eggbut is another good option, right?[/QUOTE]

I mean I wouldn’t use an eggbut just because I think they’re ugly and serve the same purpose as a d-ring. I’ve always heard that a loose ring can pinch and that’s why you use bit guards, but that could be a myth.

Properly fitted is the key here. Put a 5" loose ring on a 17+h WB with fat lips, it’s gonna rub.

You can use a loose ring. I was told by a few manufacturers that the modern day bits are tooled much more precisely than in earlier days so do not require bit guards.