New Ford F-150 Lightning electric?

Anyone look into these for towing a horse trailer? Capacity is good, but I’ve learned enough here that capacity isn’t the only thing you need to tow horses.

At this point, it is a bit of a dream, but maybe in a year or two. I would only be towing short distances (<150 miles RT) max 2 horses.

I am on the list to get one. I must add that I have been holding out with a 2001 Chevy 2500 HD for years because I did not want to buy another gas truck. Your are correct the Lightnings are going to be awesome pullers. I looked at the weight of the truck and it is going to be about the same weight as the F-150 gasser.

i currently use my 2500HD to pull a 2 horse 4Star GN with a 4’ short wall. So it is not a terribly heavy trailer, but I need a 3/4 ton for that setup. I will also add that the reliability of that Chevy has been outstanding. But it’s time for an EV.

I am not sure what I am going to haul with when I get the Lightning. I am planning on another trailer, and I’m fine with a BP. I only haul to local shows and to the vet. And I only haul one horse. Somewhere I feel like I read that the bed payload is 1000 pounds, which may let me pull a GN, but perhaps a smaller one than I have now.

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The Lightnings are rated at 10,000lbs towing and 2,000lbs bed.

https://media.ford.com/content/fordmedia/fna/us/en/news/2021/05/19/all-electric-ford-f-150-lightning.html

So you should be able to pull a two horse trailer with no problems. How far you can go is another issue.

Currently the truck is rated to go 230 miles on base or 300 with extended. That may not sound like a lot, but it the rating is based on two people in the body, with 1,000lbs in the bed, so an empty truck with a driver could probably go over 300 miles on the base model.

But if you load it down with a trailer? Think maybe 180miles with the base.

Start saving your ducets for the extended.

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I thought the actual towing was 3,500 pounds?

I need 7,200.

These trucks are going to be amazing. From the Ford site:

F-150 Lightning targets 563 horsepower, 775 lb.-ft. of near instantaneous torque4 – more than any F-150 ever – and a 0-60 mph time in the mid-4-second range when equipped with an extended-range battery, based on typical industry methodology. F-150 Lightning targets a maximum 2,000 pounds of payload in the standard-range model with 18-inch wheels, and a maximum 10,000 pounds of available towing capacity on XLT and Lariat trucks with the extended-range battery and Max Trailer Tow Package. The low center of gravity brings even more confident handling whether traveling along rain-slicked roads or through sand.

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I love Ford trucks. Have driven them since I was 16 years old. My first an 84 Ranger then later a 90 Ranger then a 2001 Ranger. After that a 2003 F150 now a 2017 F150. Word of warning. I LOVE Ford trucks. But new technology in these vehicles can be a nightmare…. Might want to wait the initial models out. My experience has been that the zupped up technology is what fails. The simple mechanical upgrades have been lovely. YMMV

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I was excited when they first came out, but the range isn’t enough for me. Towing generally cuts range by 40-50%, and the nearest big vet hospital is about 130 miles away. Since there’s nowhere to charge there, getting there and back on a single charge is unlikely.

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Currently the truck is rated to go 230 miles on base or 300 with extended. That may not sound like a lot, but it the rating is based on two people in the body, with 1,000lbs in the bed, so an empty truck with a driver could probably go over 300 miles on the base model.

But if you load it down with a trailer? Think maybe 180miles with the base.

Less than that. Towing usually cuts range by 40-50%.

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Well now I feel old. It took me far too long to realize this was a new model they were coming out with.

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Long time Ford lover here, but that is downright fugly.

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I wouldn’t have another Ford if someone gave it to me. Well…maybe then…

FORD = Figure On Repairs Daily

FORD = Found On Road Dead

I have a family member involved in the electric semi truck business. I made a similar point that I couldn’t see how it would be viable because of the size of the batteries needed to go 500+ miles between charges. He explained that apparently electric vehicles use less electricity to tow the weight than you would assume, and that doubling the weight doesn’t actually double the amount of electricity used like it can with gas vehicles. And also, all the energy lost to braking in a gas vehicle is saved to be reused in a electric one. So essentially, you might not loose as much range as you would expect with these.

Take this with a grain of salt though, because he is working with big semis that will be in the half a million to million dollar range new, and I have 0 engineering experience.

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That’s not a picture of the F-150 Lightning.

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Oh it is. It’s of the one they made in the late 90s early 00s. They switched the name to the “heritage” Ford lightning now I guess.

And I hate Ford, and yes it is ugly. Late 90s, early 00s.

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I didn’t realize Ford made electric trucks in the 90s.

This is a concern about electric tow vehicles that I don’t think I fully appreciated until you said it.

Twice in the past 3 years I’ve had to haul ass to the university hospital in the middle of the night. While it’s not as far for me as your situation, what do you do if your truck isn’t fully charged? Even if there is a place to recharge it along your route, that is time consuming.

Electric vehicles are our future. But I do hope we can develop technology to improve range and reduce the time needed to recharge.

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It was a sport model, not electric.

Google it if you don’t believe me. They’re reusing a model name. Here, go buy one. :slight_smile:

https://www.cargurus.com/Cars/l-Used-Ford-F-150-SVT-Lightning-d339

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I understand reusing the name. But it’s not the same vehicle at all.

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Something else that can significantly impact the range is climate. Cold winter weather can reduce the range up to 40%, it’s recommended to preheat EVs while they’re still plugged in and then switch to the heated seats/steering wheel instead of using cabin heat.
A/C also impacts the range, something to consider for everyone who’s been in these heat waves.

I’m waiting for my civic to die so that I can replace it with a Bolt. I joined a couple FB groups a while back and have learned a lot. The Bolt should be a good daily driver for me. I may have to fast charge once in awhile. For longer trips we might consider taking one of the trucks or renting a car if charging is too inconvenient with the time frame.

We ordered a new F-150 with the tow and heavy payload package for SOs electrical business back in March (still hasn’t arrived). When they announced the Lightning we seriously looked into it. Being an inverter it would be seriously convenient on a jobsite. Unfortunately he just drives too much for it to be worth it, at least one day/wk it’s likely he’d go over that range, especially in the winter. And too many rural jobsites that don’t have power and are nowhere near fast chargers. We may reconsider when our second truck needs to be replaced, by then there should be some affordable used Lightnings around.

Thinking about my horse friends. There are a few that could get away with a range like that, even in the winter. But it definitely wouldn’t work for my trainer or at my parents farm.

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