Abscess advice?

Hey!

So, My 7yo OTTB pulled lame on 6-6-13, blew the abscess on 6-28-13:D, and apparently has ANOTHER abscess in the same foot now. The day after we thought it was just soreness from prolonged lameness, but after a week plus that should go away.:uhoh:

The first abscess was treated with a Epsom salt boot and icthamol around the top-one off, one on. it worked after a while, and she now has a hole in her foot to prove it, but I’ve been treating with the same thing and it’s not helping…at all.:concern:

Any advice is helpful, thanks!

:cool:OTTB’s make for the best Jump Off’s:cool:

Remove the source of the metabolic insult to stop the chronic abscessing.

Agree with LMH-----------can you figure out what is the cause? Are the abscesses in her sole or the white line area or where?

When we had one last summer, we did the soak thing. It made her hoof chippy. If I was going to do it again, I would just use a poultice & wrap the hoof. everyone raves about Animalintex.

You can’t be sure that the 2 abscesses are not caused by the same thing and just took different tracks, resulting on “2” abscesses.

Sometimes abscesses just happen, not related to metabolic issues :slight_smile:

[QUOTE=JB;7070135]

Sometimes abscesses just happen, not related to metabolic issues :)[/QUOTE]

Exactly. Very frequently abscesses are caused by bruising due to thin soles.

Has the foot been x-rayed to rule out fracture or foreign body? The horse most likely just has a very large abscess that hasn’t fully drained yet.

We have found that abcesses resolve completely and more
promptly when after the vet or farrier opens the abcess to
allow it to drain, we squirt Today mastitis medication into
the opening. This antibiotic seems to kill whatever material
has infected the hoof.

[QUOTE=grayarabpony;7070136]Exactly. Very frequently abscesses are caused by bruising due to thin soles.

[/QUOTE]

Which brings us back to that pesky metabolic issue.

[QUOTE=JB;7070135]

Sometimes abscesses just happen, not related to metabolic issues :)[/QUOTE]

You might be surprised at just how infrequently that happens…meaning a ‘metabolic free abscess’ is a rare finding.

It is a matter of looking further back in the time lime of events.

So many people still think of laminitis or metabolic issues as hoof issues…they fail to see the connection of all the connective tissue in the body.

So a poor may not be foot sore or have pulses but still be starting down the metabolic runaway train.

Unless you have a trauma (and I dare say most healthy horses can deal with the trauma), you are most likely going to find a metabolic connection.

In fact the abscess IS a warning sign that comes before the pulses etc…

The bigger problem is everyone sitting around waiting on a scientific study to prove it while horses are getting the short end of the stick. LOL

Yeah, because all TBs with thin soles have metabolic issues.

/ Sarcasm. I miss the old rolly eyes emoticon.

We, as readers, don’t know what is going on with this horse. However, bruising and subsequent abscessing can be caused by trauma to the foot, without the horse being in a pre-state of metabolic disaster.

OP, call your vet.

[QUOTE=grayarabpony;7070477]Yeah, because all TBs with thin soles have metabolic issues.

[/QUOTE]

Well…yes pretty much. Particularly if the thin soles are accompanied by a hoof sitting low in the capsule (shown by radiographs).

Well I will chime in by saying that I just sold a TB who does not have the best feet. He had anhydrosis issues and abcess issues before I got him. Very easy keeper. Took a long time to shed out in spring.

I always suspected metabolic issues and while I had him, I was fanatic about not too much sugar. He got TC Senior which is very low. And careful with the grass. Never had abcesses, sweat just fine. Abcessing again at new home. I told them easy on the sugar, but I don’t think they believe me.

So the metabolic side of abscesses is interesting. It could be an ongoing issue or like in my youngster’s case it could be a part issue coming to the surface. My 2 year old abscessed 5 times in 2 months this spring. Last fall when I bought him he was in good weight and appeared perfectly healthy but the vet mentioned the excessive sun bleaching of his coat. She attributed it to a possible copper deficiency but who knows what else may have been missing as well. We came up with a nutritional plan that he was on for about 10 months before the abscessing started. What she told me at the time is that she sees this happen very often with rescues and horses with metabolic deficiencies at about the 9 to 12 month mark after being put on a proper diet. Sure enough my youngster’s abscessing started at about 10 months after we corrected his diet, lasted two months, and hadn’t taken a bad step since. As others have mentioned, I would definitely look at possible nutritional issues, particularly if he abscesses again.

This is the sentence that jumped out at me…was the horse on spring grass? As a 2yo I would assume so.

He was actually still on our large but grass/mud free sacrifice area. We are wet into early summer here in the PNW and I re-seeded my pasture last year so they’ve only recently been reintroduced to grass.

Thanks for clarifying…I would be interested in what he was eating…not to make a suggestions (as you didn’t ask) but just for my own information.

Other common spring triggers can be vaccinations or deworming, new or different batch of hay, spring weeds, etc

Heck about anything that can create stress can trigger a response because of the change in hormone levels, etc.

Did the horse recently come out of shoes? Old nail holes = access for abcesses.

Or, if in shoes, is your shoer nailing “a little close?” For some horses, “close” is no different than “pricked.”

Ask me how I know. (Had one of those for 21 years!)

[QUOTE=LMH;7070672]Thanks for clarifying…I would be interested in what he was eating…not to make a suggestions (as you didn’t ask) but just for my own information.

Other common spring triggers can be vaccinations or deworming, new or different batch of hay, spring weeds, etc

Heck about anything that can create stress can trigger a response because of the change in hormone levels, etc.[/QUOTE]

Of course! I apologize in advance for the long post and I hope this isn’t hijacking the thread but I think discussing this stuff in any horse can be helpful when trying to diagnose a cause and come up with a long term remedy. “Baby horse” is an Oldenburg who I had gelded in January in case that’s of significance. He arrived at my place at 18 mos, he’s now almost 2 1/2. The abscessing occurred in March before his 2nd birthday and lasted through about the end of April.

At his old place he was on a grass hay plus pasture. I can’t tell you about the quality - I bought him sight unseen and what they sent on the van was gone when he got here. No supplements, hence the suspected (likely?) nutritional deficiency. Like I said, he was in good weight and looked well, but looks don’t tell the whole story as we all know.

He’s now on a high quality local grass hay, I really wish I had the test results handy to share. Generally local western WA hay is of lesser nutritional quality but this guy grows amazing hay. He had actually been trying to get my vet to buy from him for several years. He finally developed a crop that tested as good or better than high quality Eastern WA hay, which is generally considered far superior. Anyhow - he has free choice hay - bought last fall just before I purchased the youngster and he’s been on it since the day he arrived.

I started him on LMF Development G (NW formula) when he got here - 3lbs per feeding, twice a day (weaned onto that amount over time of course). That’s what he was on from the time he arrived through the abscess issue. I just recently (about 5 or 6 weeks after the last abscess blew) moved him over to Strategy Healthy Edge instead, 2lbs per feeding twice a day at the moment but I’m still adjusting slightly to find the right amount for optimal weight and now to account for another little growth spurt. I feed his grain with 2 or 3 pounds of soaked beet pulp pellets morning and night.

He also gets one scoop per day of Platinum Performance Equine fed with his evening grain. I started giving him the PPE about a week after he got here and he’s been on it every since. He’s now been weaned back onto the pasture and has access to the grass 24 hours a day but like I said, was still on the sacrifice area during the abscessing.

We are basically positive that his abscessing was caused by bits of sand/gravel working up into the white line - the fronts in particular were quite soft - but we think the thinness/weakness of the hoof was caused by the nutritional deficiency. What is interesting is that we had changed nothing nutritionally in the 9 months he’d been here and I can’t think of any stressors that occurred leading up to or during the chronic abscess period. He was completely fine through fall and winter on the same sacrifice area with the same exact footing. He’s also completely fine now on the same footing (he has access to the pasture but has to travel through the sacrifice area to get there and still spends a good amount of time hanging out in the sacrifice area). Didn’t do any vaccinations prior to the abscessing and no change in my worming routine. The only possibility in what you mentioned would be weed consumption if he reached through the fence and nabbed something or I guess something in the hay, but it’s the same hay he’s been getting all along. FWIW my retired horse is on the same hay and in the same turnout situation as the youngster, only difference is he’s always been on the Healthy Edge, not the Development G that baby horse was on.

I’m actually super interested to hear your thoughts. He’s been sound with no abscessing for a couple of months now but I’d love to figure out what may have caused it as we were never really able to come up with a hard diagnosis other than that my vet has seen this happen frequently in horses with deficiencies in about the same time frame.

Regarding primarily metabolic issues :rolleyes: There is a distinct difference between an unnoticed puncture wound, corns, sole bruising, and “metabolic issues”—not to lame your hobbyhorse. And yes! I’m very familiar with metabolic issues, and grass and grains, having been in this horse habit entirely too long.

Greyarabpony -It’s still there. Just type it out.

[QUOTE=merrygoround;7070787]Regarding primarily metabolic issues :rolleyes: There is a distinct difference between an unnoticed puncture wound, corns, sole bruising, and “metabolic issues”—not to lame your hobbyhorse. And yes! I’m very familiar with metabolic issues, and grass and grains, having been in this horse habit entirely too long.

Greyarabpony -It’s still there. Just type it out.[/QUOTE]

So I guess the rollling eyes are your mature respectful way to disagree. Interesting approach!

Yes there can be trauma. I think I mentioned trauma? I believe (perhaps you missed it while you were searching for the emoticon) I said aside from trauma…though I did clarify that most ‘healthy’ horses can deal with trauma quite well.

I would even venture to say a healthy horse can handle a small puncture or bruise without developing an abscess. Let’s go even farther to say a healthy horse won’t even get the bruise short of a pretty wicked trauma.

So my little rolling eye friend, I still stand by what I said, even if you don’t agree and have yet not considered the far reaching ramifications of the impact of ‘stuff’ (sugar, etc that creates metabolic imbalances) can have on all aspect of the horse…including abscessing as an early indicator that things are out of order.

Regarding sole bruising…see above.

Should I REALLY blow your mind now and say something like laminitis is not just a hoof issue but an entire body wide connective tissue issue? Which emoticon would that get me?

My apologies that this information is news to you considering your long standing habit.