Confederate Symbology in Contemporary American Foxhunting

Does you club have a history of using Confederate symbology or currently use it as part of the club’s identity? If so, what is your opinion if it? Thanks.
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One of the things I like about hunting is that it is a break from the everyday stresses and issues. I also like that people are respectful enough to leave their politics at home. That is the way it should be.

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Yes, FitToBeTied, that’s a very important aspect of the sport to me too. Hounds, horses and foxes in the beautiful outdoors, doing things that Nature embraces. Ideally, people go along for the ride and watch/listen respectfully.

Tally-ho, all.

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Yes, lately it is the one place it seems to be possible lately.

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Neither the Master, Huntsman, hounds, members or followers study symbols. There is nothing opinion worthy.

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huh? 55 years of fox hunting . . .five different hunts – can’t say this topic ever arose . . .

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Does your club? I’m curious because this seems like a very odd question.

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Obviously a symbolic provocateur.

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skydy- yes. The hunt color is Confederate Gray. It does not sound like this is common. Thank you -

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You aren’t leaving your politics at home if you are dressed in Confederate Gray, now are you?

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It’s just the color of a material not a political statement. I’m pretty sure you could just call it something else if you want.

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Ask your club to change the name to Loser Gray. You’ll feel better.

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If your club did use any kind of Confederate symbology, it would seem that the politics would be right there inside already.

If no clubs do, that’s excellent. Also, I think it’s a fair question to ask, given the history of who founded those clubs, and it’s good for club members to specifically look for it internally, because sometimes this kind of imagery and the like has been sitting unnoticed for a long long time. Better to find it internally and remove it before external forces do.

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It is a totally reasonable question to ask and I think the color should be named something else. there are many grey names.
grey fox grey comes to mind.
and some topics are politics and some topics are morals and values and ethics and I think there is always a place for those.

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I agree that it’s a fair (and timely) question to ask and while I am not sure the color “Confederate Grey” would be enough to make me re-think joining a hunt, there are certain symbols that would for sure.

I, too, like the fact that in the hunt field, personal politics rarely come into play, but I think in these times politics are everywhere and many people are taking the opportunity to consider symbols they may not have really pondered before. And, to my mind, that is a very good thing. Not all traditions are good traditions.

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If the membership is concerned they could approach the Masters with their concern. Given the hunt’s location in Virginia change is certainly possible in this day and time.

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I think it’s a great question, not odd at all.

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What if the membership isn’t concerned, just one? Can just one approach the “Master” for change?

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Overly PC in my view.

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The most intelligent item written in this entire thread.

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